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One of the inevitable events that will happen in a human’s life is death. People have developed a strange and curious connection with death and many societies throughout history have created so many rituals to do when someone dies. Cavemen have been known to place the bodies of their dead in huge vessels made of clay, the Egyptians mummified them, and there were some like the Vikings that chose to burn their deceased upon funeral pyres. Out of all these practices concerning death and burial, the ones that are still common and popular among people are burials in traditional coffins and cremation. However, in the more recent times, more and more are turning to the latter rather than the former as a means of burial. Here gentrygriffey.com, you get more detail information about cremation. Cremation is the process of completely incinerating a body, leaving behind the very fragile bones which are then ground into ashes. The ashes are then put into an urn or other type of container. What the deceased’s family does with the ashes could vary. The ashes could be scattered somewhere in the world as per the deceased’s request, kept in the house inside the urn or vessel, or otherwise assimilated into another object depending on what was planned between the deceased and his family before death. Some have developed creative ways to do with the ashes, such as launching the ashes into space or using pressure to create diamonds. There have also been cases wherein some people had their ashes mixed into fireworks and shot into the sky, while others have had their ashes mixed into paint and used to create works of art. Whatever the use later, the process of cremation is mostly the same – using very high temperatures to burn most of the deceased’s body and grind up what is left. The reason why cremation has become more popular as a means of burial also varies. Many choose to get cremated when they die because it’s cheaper and more convenient than a traditional entombment burial (being buried whole inside a coffin). A coffin is more expensive, as is buying a plot in a cemetery and paying for the burial service and rites. There is also the matter of maintaining the grave when the burial is done and to keep maintaining it for the next few years. Some people think of cremation as a means of cleansing themselves when they die, while others wish to have their ashes scattered somewhere. The Process Before the body is incinerated, it must be approved to undergo the process first. While in the process of being approved, the body is kept inside a long compartment inside a big room along with several others. Each body lies on a long, metal table that can be pulled out from their respective compartments. The room is temperature-controlled to keep the bodies from decaying fast and cannot be burned until a medical examiner has signed the proper documents. When everything is in order, the deceased is placed in a coffin or container made of flammable material such as cardboard or plywood. Workers take care to remove any object on the body that might explode or have any radioactive properties. The incinerator is then preheated to about 536 degrees Celsius and the body is easily slipped in. Sometimes, the workers will allow the family to watch the body being burned through a window or have them start the machine themselves with a press of a button. The fire inside ignited the flammable container and starts to dry out the body. Any soft tissues will tighten then vaporize in the heat and the bones become calcified and brittle. Burning a body completely usually takes two to three hours. The amount of ash left usually depends on the bone structure of the deceased. For instance, newborns are not recommended to be cremated because they do not have a set bone structure left and thus will not leave behind a lot of ashes to be kept. After the body has been completely burned, the fragile bones remaining are swept into the grinder to be pounded and ground into fine dust (in truth, the end product is more like very fine gravel as opposed to actual ashes). Some family could opt to have the urn with the ashes inside shipped, though this requires special types of papers and careful handling. There are also some carriers that do not ship ashes at all. To those that do, papers containing the identity of the deceased is also shipped along with the urn to prevent any mix ups.

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